You can lose weight by eating fewer calories and by increasing your physical activity. Reducing the amount of total fat and saturated fat that you eat is one way to limit your overall calorie intake. However, eating fat-free or reduced-fat foods isn’t always the answer to weight loss. A fat-free food is not necessarily low in calories; in fact, it could be higher in calories because of added sugars. Calories may also be added when you eat more of the reduced-fat or fat-free food than you would of the regular item. For example, if you eat twice as many fat-free cookies as you would regular cookies you actually have increased your overall calorie intake. The following list of foods and their reduced-fat varieties demonstrates that just because a product is fat-free, it doesn’t mean that it is “calorie-free.”

Fat-Free or Reduced Fat Regular
Calories Calories
Reduced-fat peanut butter, 2 T 187 Regular peanut butter, 2 T 191
Reduced-fat chocolate chip cookies, 3 cookies (30 g) 118 Regular chocolate chip cookies, 3 cookies (30 g) 142
Fat-free fig cookies, 2 cookies (30 g) 102 Regular fig cookies, 2 cookies (30 g) 111
Nonfat vanilla frozen yogurt (<1% fat), 1/2 cup 100 Regular whole milk vanilla frozen yogurt (3-4% fat), 1/2 cup 104
Light vanilla ice cream (7% fat), 1/2 cup 111 Regular vanilla ice cream (11% fat), 1/2 cup 133
Fat-free caramel topping, 2 T 103 Caramel topping, homemade with butter, 2 T 103
Low-fat granola cereal, approx. 1/2 cup (55 g) 213 Regular granola cereal, approx. 1/2 cup (55 g) 257
Low-fat blueberry muffin, 1 small (2 1/2 inch) 131 Regular blueberry muffin, 1 small (2 1/2 inch) 138
Baked tortilla chips, 1 oz. 113 Regular tortilla chips, 1 oz. 143
Low-fat cereal bar, 1 bar (1.3 oz.) 130 Regular cereal bar, 1 bar (1.3 oz.) 140

Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.
Nutrient data taken from Nutrient Data System for Research, Nutrition Coordinating Center, University of Minnesota.

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The FDA's organization consists of the Office of the Commissioner and four directorates overseeing the core functions of the agency: Medical Products and Tobacco, Foods, Global Regulatory Operations and Policy, and Operations.

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Other articles by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA):

Losing Weight: Start By Counting Calories
Avoid ‘Fad’ Diets
Tips for Eating Out
How to Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label

Article source: Fat-Free vs. Regular Calorie Comparison

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