Avoid ‘Fad’ Diets

The cabbage soup diet, the low-carbohydrate and high-protein diet, and other so-called “fad” diets are fundamentally different from federal nutrition dietary guidelines and are not recommended for losing weight. Fad diets usually overemphasize one particular food or type of food, contradicting the guidelines for good nutrition, which recommend eating a variety of foods from the Food Guide Pyramid. These diets may work at first because they cut calories, but they rarely have a permanent effect.

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Tips for Eating Out

Ask for nutrition information (for example, calories, saturated fat, and sodium) before you order when eating out. Choose foods that are steamed, broiled, baked, roasted, poached, or stir-fried, but not deep-fat fried. Share food, such as a main dish or dessert, with your dining partner. Take part of the food home with you and refrigerate immediately. You may want to ask for a take-home container when the meal arrives. Spoon half the meal into it, so you’re more likely to eat only what’s left on your plate. Request your meal to be served without gravy, sauces, butter or margarine. Ask for salad dressing on the side, and use only small… Read More

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Slow brain waves play key role in coordinating complex activity

14 September 2006 BERKELEY – While it is widely accepted that the output of nerve cells carries information between regions of the brain, it’s a big mystery how widely separated regions of the cortex involving billions of cells are linked together to coordinate complex activity. A new study by neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and neurosurgeons and neurologists at UC San Francisco (UCSF) is beginning to answer that question.

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BMI — Body Mass Index

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a number calculated from a person‘s weight and height. BMI provides a reliable indicator of body fatness for most people and is used to screen for weight categories that may lead to health problems.

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I Ching or Book of Changes

The Book of Changes—I Ching in Chinese—is unquestionably one of the most important books in the world’s literature. Its origin goes back to mythical antiquity, and it has occupied the attention of the most eminent scholars of China down to the present day. Nearly all that is greatest and most significant in the three thousand years of Chinese cultural history has either taken its inspiration from this book, or has exerted an influence on the interpretation of its text. Therefore it may safely be said that the seasoned wisdom of thousands of years has gone into the making of the I Ching. Small wonder then that both of the two branches of Chinese philosophy, Confucianism and Taoism, have their common roots here. The book sheds new light on many a secret hidden in the often puzzling modes of thought of that mysterious sage, Lao-tse, and of his pupils, as well as on many ideas that appear in the Confucian tradition as axioms, accepted without further examination.

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